nitrate control

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Re: nitrate control

Postby Rohan » Thu Aug 27, 2015 4:01 pm

What exactly you mean by bio pellet? Any pic for reference?
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Re: nitrate control

Postby mr_feynman » Thu Aug 27, 2015 8:35 pm

I believe, he refers to marine bio-pellets. They are small beads of bio-degradable polymers used in a 'bio-pellet reactor'... reactor looks like a moving bed reactor. A pump tumbles those polymer beads; this polymer is designed by the manufacturer to be able to get scavenged by a few strains of marine bacteria and eventually as the export nutrient those bacteria are absorbing nitrate and phosphate along with.

so, tumbling bio degradable pellets + polymer scavenging bac + nitrate + phosphate --> a bio film by product --> protein skimmer --> tossed out of the system


Hi subhashisghosh,

For FW, nitrate removal can help to reduce frequency of wc -- but can not a perennial thing. Keeping that in mind you can try out the following-

1. Use pothos (money plant in our local term) / floaters like Amazon Frogbit / Pistia
2. Grow aquaponics like tomato (highest nitrate affinity)
3. Use large 3-6 inch lava rocks -- can aid in full nitrogen cycle -nitrification and denitrification (seachem stability has denitrifying strains too)
4. Use filter socks; bleach them every week and replace. In this way, input is removed before it is being broken down to nitrate.

And keep in mind that most of the aquarium plants have more affinity to ammonia compared to nitrate -- few are exceptions. Like pothos, Frogbit, Tomato etc.
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Re: nitrate control

Postby Kalyan » Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:23 am

SanamMarik wrote: Discus requires zero nitrates.... :)


Not really .. They can live well near 15 ppm NO3 level .. Growth will not be effected .
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Re: nitrate control

Postby netherwinterknights » Fri Aug 28, 2015 10:39 am

If you use zeolite, or other such commercial products, they need to be re-generated or re-activated after a while. Remember that once you stop the habit of water changes, then you will very likely mess up the one odd time when you do have to perform a pwc. If you cannot donate time and efforts for a pet, then that pet is better off in another home.

In our quest to reduce efforts required to keep fish and other pets happy, we try to automate everything, and there is a level of complexity which is acceptable. Very often, most aquarium issues can be solved by a PWC, and we end up spending thousands of rupees to prevent a PWC. In case you have a canister filter, PWCs are as easy as opening the outlet pipe into a bucket.

Not wanting to sound too negative, all your pets will appreciate the few efforts minutes you spend for them. If not literally, then at least mentally.
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Re: nitrate control

Postby SanamMarik » Fri Aug 28, 2015 5:59 pm

Kalyan wrote:
SanamMarik wrote: Discus requires zero nitrates.... :)


Not really .. They can live well near 15 ppm NO3 level .. Growth will not be effected .

I read so somewhere....may b wasnt a good info thn... :(
Also never have had a no3 kit to test my tank parameters to testify the info I had. :(

Thanks fr the correction. :)
Btw as per ur suggestion, gt a pH kit finally.. :D
Dont remember the results. Will ping you. :)
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Re: nitrate control

Postby subhashisghosh » Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:19 am

mr_feynman wrote:I believe, he refers to marine bio-pellets. They are small beads of bio-degradable polymers used in a 'bio-pellet reactor'... reactor looks like a moving bed reactor. A pump tumbles those polymer beads; this polymer is designed by the manufacturer to be able to get scavenged by a few strains of marine bacteria and eventually as the export nutrient those bacteria are absorbing nitrate and phosphate along with.

so, tumbling bio degradable pellets + polymer scavenging bac + nitrate + phosphate --> a bio film by product --> protein skimmer --> tossed out of the system


Hi subhashisghosh,

For FW, nitrate removal can help to reduce frequency of wc -- but can not a perennial thing. Keeping that in mind you can try out the following-

1. Use pothos (money plant in our local term) / floaters like Amazon Frogbit / Pistia
2. Grow aquaponics like tomato (highest nitrate affinity)
3. Use large 3-6 inch lava rocks -- can aid in full nitrogen cycle -nitrification and denitrification (seachem stability has denitrifying strains too)
4. Use filter socks; bleach them every week and replace. In this way, input is removed before it is being broken down to nitrate.

And keep in mind that most of the aquarium plants have more affinity to ammonia compared to nitrate -- few are exceptions. Like pothos, Frogbit, Tomato etc.


Hello,

Last week I have installed Bio pellet reactor in my tank to control nitrate.

I have used: Bio pellet Reactor from Marine Source
Bio pellet- NP sure Pure
Pump- Eheim Compact+3000
Hose- Locally Available

Some suggestion required from experts:-
1. I am confuse regarding Tummbling rate of pellets is ok or not ?? - As pellets in 70% area tumblled and rest area is very very slow. If I am able to attach vedio then understading will be very clear.
2. How long I have to run my reactor in a day ??
3. After How many days the Nitrate level will start to get down.

Please shere your view to help me on that regard.
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Re: nitrate control

Postby subhashisghosh » Sun Nov 15, 2015 11:30 am

Expected experts are reply soon.Waiting for response. :-\
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Re: nitrate control

Postby mr_feynman » Sun Nov 15, 2015 4:28 pm

Bio-pellets are designed to be consumed by marine strains of bacteria, I am not sure how this would perform for freshwater!
Nevertheless, it is a good experimentation to see how things go in freshwater.

But few points that I can assume:

1. as this is all about bacteria, please consider some good supplementary bacteria like Seachem Stability (IMO).
2. As long as the tank water is passed through all of the bio-pellets, it is good.
3. Also need to check how phosphate plays a major role-- because bio-pellets (carbon source) + NO3 + PO4 = forms the system! If you are in planted domain, then PO4 removal can hamper plant growth; also complete devoid of NO3 can also impact plants.

Estimated time to remove NO3: you need to measure with a test kit, because every tank is different in its own way! For e.g.: live stock load, feeding quantity per day, tank maintenance schedule etc.

And one honest suggestion: In aquariums we try to mimic nature in a glassbox, therefore the parameters we try to achieve is a balance, not to completely remove one or other elements entirely! And the most effective way is to go for more natural or organic solutions rather than more equipment! Think, when you need to replace the used up bio-pellets, and there is a gap of week after which you can get the ordered bio-pellets in hand! That one week may be a nightmare for your tank -- parameters will go haywire! Even, you can have a crash!

In marine systems, we can see probably more equipments than freshwater, because, simulating marine in earlier days were completely troublesome, aquarists needed sea-water transported, then came the age of marine salts, RO water, and bunch of equipments partially due to lucrative business opportunity and partially due to the fact that it's for sure you cant simulate a true marine in a glassbox even with today's most advanced technology-- marine ecosystem is way too complex to emulate in home aquaria!
In freshwater, things are much easy to simulate natural parameters and we strive for that too!

Hope this helps.
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Re: nitrate control

Postby subhashisghosh » Sat Dec 05, 2015 4:19 pm

Thank u for very knowledgable support to me regarding above.
I have a doubt!!
Is there Protine Skimmer is required ??
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Re: nitrate control

Postby mr_feynman » Sun Dec 06, 2015 7:44 pm

No... in freshwater, bubbles form but they pop out immediately because the specific gravity of freshwater is much less if compared with sea water! That's why the protein skimmer system does not work properly!
One exception is koi pond where bio-load is too much and sp. gravity of pond becomes much higher -- skimmers work there!
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